Here are all of the posts tagged ‘influencer campaign’.

Live young this January with evian

by Amy Hambridge in News

Hands up if you’ve already broken your New Year’s resolution?  If you’re anything like me, you probably gave up on your vow to stop eating cake/drinking cocktails/taking unnecessary taxis (delete where applicable) by the time the first day back at work came around.

New Year’s resolutions really can be a bore. Luckily for us, evian has recognised this and instead of focussing on the depressing side of having to give up your favourite things in gloomy January, they’re here to put a smile on our faces. And, as you may have read in Ad Age, we’ve been working with evian to bring their ‘Live young January’ campaign to life by creating a live social hub on Facebook which pulls together all the latest online and offline activity surrounding the campaign.

Live young January Hub

At the centre of the activity are 31 different ways to help you Live young this month.  These range from playing rock, paper, scissors for helping make decisions, to making a den in your living room – for evian, Living young isn’t about age, it’s a mindset.  Every day throughout January, we’ve been posting a new way to Live young on the evian UK Facebook wall and, so far, engagement rates have been soaring, showing that the campaign is having great traction amongst the fans. And whilst we’re talking fans, in just 1 week, the Facebook fan base has increased by a whopping 21,000 likes.

Today's way to Live young

To drive further engagement around the campaign on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, we’re also running a competition giving fans the opportunity to win the ultimate Live young experience – a trip to Lapland to see the Northern Lights. Entrants simply need to submit a photo showing themselves Living young this month for their chance to win.

Win the ultimate Live young experience: Watching the Northern Lights from your very own igloo

What’s really great about the Live young January activity, is that it’s truly integrated. We’ve been working as part of a cross-agency team with Havas Worldwide, Mediaedge CIA, Shine Communications and Live and Breathe to bring the campaign to life across all channels. In case you haven’t seen or heard about it, evian brought a giant pink snow-making ‘Live young playground‘ to London last week with the aim of encouraging commuters to find their inner Live young spirit by taking time out to play. There were digital panels on the underground to cheer up the commute and promote the playground, plus, there’s been lots of conversation on Twitter from people enjoying the magic of snow falling around them as they swing.

The evian Live young swings

Of course, we wanted to maximise the reach and conversational buzz around the offline activity online and, with this in mind, we hooked up with a couple of influential bloggers in London and took them on a ‘Live young January’ day to remember. We started at the evian swings in Canary Wharf and gave them goodie bags containing envelopes which enclosed some of the 31 ways to Live young as clues to where we would be taking them throughout the day.  From exploring the wonders of Hamley’s toy shop and indulging in a Mad Hatter’s themed afternoon tea, to a karaoke session and a street art graffiti lesson to unlock their creativity; the day was tailored to ensure the bloggers had plenty of Live young content to capture and blog about.

The Live young January Blogger experience

It’s going to be an exciting couple of weeks building on the early results we’ve seen so far. The evian UK ‘Live young January’ campaign is live until, well…er, the end of January (!), so if, like me, you’re not always the best at sticking to those month long New Year resolutions, why not forget about taking yourself too seriously and aim to do a daily Live young challenge instead?

Happy New Year!

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Earth Hour 2010: help spread the word

by Simon Collister in News Google+

Earth Hour 2010, the global event when people, businesses and iconic buildings around the world will switch off their lights for an hour at 8.30pm local time is coming up again this Saturday, 27th March.

We’re working with the WWF to get the word out to bloggers to start conversations about Earth Hour, encourage people to sign-up to show their support and send a clear message to the world’s governments that climate change needs to be addressed urgently.

Hopefully, by working together we can top last year’s awesome achievements which saw hundreds of millions of people across 3,000 cities and towns in 83 countries participate.

If you have a blog, or a Twitter account or are on Facebook it would be fantastic if you could blog about Earth Hour and even better if you could ask your readers, friends, families, colleagues to get involved too.

If you’re keen to do more, WWF have come up with a number of online resources for you to use, including:

And if none of those takes your fancy then there are loads of other ways to show your support and take part.

Every contribution, no matter how small you think it might be (even re-tweeting this post would help!), is important, so please help us and show your support. Essentially, the more signups we get, the more we can show governments around the world how seriously their people now consider global warming to be, and how loud their voice is on this urgent issue.

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The Destination and The Conversation

by Robin Grant in News Google+

Our friend Nick Burcher, Head of Products / Partnerships EMEA at Publicis’ VivaKi, drew me a diagram last time we caught up for coffee outlining his social media world view, which he’s since written up. I think it’s a valuable perspective (although there is something missing, which I’ll come to below):

The Destination and The Conversation

The Destination
Traditionally marketing efforts have focussed around ‘The Destination.’ Ad space is bought to push people to a main site / microsite and this could be anything from Paid Search to TV to Print. It’s all about ‘go here now!’ There is a direct correlation between ad spend and ‘Destination’ traffic. Generally increase in ad spend = increase in traffic and decreasing ad spend results in decreasing traffic.

This is changing though. New ‘Destinations’ are being created, it’s no longer just a main site or a microsite. Facebook Fan Pages are being used as an activity hub with paid ads driving traffic. Alternatively the Destination could be a YouTube channel or other social platform.

The social web is also providing new traffic driving opportunities eg Facebook Engagement ads, sponsored Diggs or socialmedia.com social banners but the biggest change to the internet landscape though is the emergence of ‘The Conversation.’

Web 1.0 was a one way street. Users went to a site and consumed information and advertisers served messages somewhere along the way. The publisher published, the consumer consumed, the advertiser advertised . On the social web the distinctions between these three areas have all blurred and changed marketing forever.

The Conversation
If advertisers can successfully participate in the Conversation then it becomes less about paid pushing. The Conversation is about engaging rather than broadcasting, and if done successfully it changes the equation. Instead of having to pay to recruit every visit, consumers can be co-opted as brand ambassadors who then will freely relay the advertiser message with consequent Destination traffic the result.

Activity targeting the Conversation needs this ‘kickstart’ to give it initial momentum. This is where new disciplines like blogger outreach and video seeding come in. This is where marketers need to think of taking content to the consumer, rather than expecting consumers to come to them – and make it easy to share using ‘Blog This’ buttons, Facebook Connect and more.

Nick is right to point that it’s no longer just about ad spend, that Destinations no longer need to be microsites (if they ever did), that the Conversation is about engaging rather than broadcasting, and that traffic can flow from the Destination to the Conversation. But what the model doesn’t take account of, is the fact that it’s the Conversation, not the Destination, that’s important, and that in some cases there doesn’t need to be a Destination.

The Conversation itself sometimes can fulfill your business or marketing objectives without reference to a Destination, creating demand by driving awareness, consideration and/or engagement through far-reaching word of mouth – whether that be through simply getting the product into the hands of bloggers and generating reviews, through viral seeding where the vast majority of the video views happen out there in the conversation cloud or through a myriad of other ways.

More progressively (and effectively), you still have a Destination, but it’s designed to facilitate, support and amplify the Conversation, and success is measured not in traffic to the Destination, but in the reach, sentiment and engagement with the Conversation itself.

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Looping the loop in social media

by Chris Applegate in News Google+

Last month we were proud to be one of the agencies working for Dunlop, and their specially-commissioned loop-the-loop stunt created by BBH. An ordinary car with Dunlop tyres was driven round a custom-built loop by Steve Truglia, one of Britain’s top stuntmen – not only to demonstrate Dunlop’s quality and endurance under pressure during the peak period for tyre sales in Europe, but to stoke the ‘wow’ factor and passion amongst fans of driving stunts and Dunlop’s brand adherents. It was shown across multiple media, including a dedicated microsite, a spot on TV’s Fifth Gear and social media outreach to car and viral fans in the UK, France, Germany, Italy and Spain to spread the message. That last part was our job, and as simple as it sounded on paper, we had to be quick on our feet throughout.

We had planned to build up anticipation about the outcome of the stunt prior to its debut on web and TV. However five days before the stunt went live, a national newspaper leaked photographs of the stunt, and as the day rolled on, the story was picked up by an increasing number of blogs and Twitter users. Months of careful planning was being undone, all without a mention of Dunlop in the coverage or Dunlop branding in the leaked photos.

To turn things around, we tracked down the key blogs and started a conversation with them about the video, introducing them to the microsite, talking about Dunlop’s involvement. We used the immediacy of Twitter to join the conversation about the stunt by setting up an official Twitter channel for Dunlop, talking with people who had spread the link and offering them more information about the stunt, while being as conversational as possible.

Having steadied the ship somewhat and set the record straight, we were then able to use the momentum created to reinforce our original idea, contacting driving and stunt video bloggers in five territories, providing them with photos and videos that were exclusive to Dunlop, and giving them the chance to ask questions the team behind the stunt.

The results were fantastic, and we’re really happy with them given the tight turnaround time. Not only did we get some great enthusiastic reactions on Twitter from the people we got in contact with, but we got great coverage in the blogosphere, with 60 blogs in five languages linking to the microsite, and at least another 24 discussing the stunt with Dunlop branding associated – amongst them blogs such as Gizmodo who had initially reported the leak were more than happy to set the record straight, strengthening the Dunlop brand association. And it wasn’t just about the sentiment – the total reach of the blogs involved was 8m unique users/month and 420k RSS subscribers, far outstripping the reach of the initial misinformed coverage from the leak – and almost all of the coverage was positive to boot.

There were several things that the video’s success brought out. Not only was it a demonstration of the power of social media to create and develop the conversation around something people love, but also a testament to the power of listening and responding to quickly and decisively correct mistakes or misconceptions. Social media offers you the opportunity to react and turn around a conversation at lightning speeds compared with more traditional messaging. However, you have to be friendly, open and willing to listen to and converse with the enthusers around your brand if you want them to listen and contribute back.

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Simple, rational, tangible truths…

by Robin Grant in News Google+

Toby Roberts, Head of Strategy at OMD UK, has written an interesting post on Better mousetraps and ‘branded experiences’.

It well worth reading the whole thing, but this in particular is worth considering:

If we actually stopped and listened to what consumers were saying instead of just muscling our way into the conversation, we would find that the vast majority of people promote brands to each other based on simple, rational, tangible truths about the product or service. This isn’t surprising, people find big abstract brand ideas almost impossible to articulate and, even if they could, would never admit to their peers that that were the reason they made a purchase.

Now, it is proven beyond reasonable doubt that emotion plays a huge role in individual brand decisions. But this is not the way people talk to each other about brands and if this is what we’re trying to unlock, we have to recognise this.

This is an insight that constantly feeds into the work we do with our clients – if you have a good product, then getting it into the hands of people who reach and are trusted by your target audience and getting them talking about it is often the best thing to do…

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